Galaxia

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Sex with the universe.

Apr 24

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brutalgeneration:

Emei Golden Summit Early Morning I (by lylevincent)

brutalgeneration:

Emei Golden Summit Early Morning I (by lylevincent)

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swamped:

Elena HelfrechtA Heart’s Tale

swamped:

Elena Helfrecht
A Heart’s Tale

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I am alone in this universe. Like. Completely.


Apr 23

I’m still amazed at how everything means something on a scale of nothing to everything depending on the person you talk to. Like we are small and insignificant but not really because we are all we have. When you look at the universe and you know it isn’t personal, yet you feel as though it is— why is that? It’s kind of hopeful and desperate but calm. Like we are absolutely nothing but we are alive in this one moment. You stare at something and you will notice more and more about it. There is something metaphorical and beautiful in anything, no matter how tiny or ugly or irrelevant. The fact that you can’t even really grasp the most mundane object in your house is just a testament to the futility of having consciousness. You understand its function, you understand it on a certain level, but you don’t understand what it means when you try to fit it into this bigger picture. So like maybe trying to make a bigger picture is the human’s mistake, but then again…can we escape the grandiose universe we hunger for?

I’ve always had trouble pushing myself from observing to experiencing, but I try to remind myself that it is the interaction— it is the inhaling and the exhaling— that I should live for, even if that means I will eventually suffocate. I still can’t push myself to accept that some things must end. I can end. But some things shouldn’t end. It just doesn’t seem right that we are in these bodies. Not right to me at all.


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I kinda want to say reading The Fault in Our Stars was a mistake due to the amount of sadness/tears/fuck no fuck no fuck no sentiment it caused me, but yeah. It wasn’t. One of the best modern books I’ve read in a long, long time.


Apr 22
astronomicalwonders:

Orion Nebula and Running Man
The Orion Nebula (also known as Messier 42, M42, or NGC 1976) is a diffuse nebula situated south of Orion’s Belt in the constellation of Orion. It is one of the brightest nebulae, and is visible to the naked eye in the night sky. M42 is located at a distance of 1,344 ± 20 light years and is the closest region of massive star formation to Earth. The M42 nebula is estimated to be 24 light years across. It has a mass of about 2000 times the mass of the Sun. Older texts frequently refer to the Orion Nebula as the Great Nebula in Orion or the Great Orion Nebula.
The Running Man Nebula (also known as NGC 1973/5/7) is a reflection nebula 1/2 degree northeast of the Orion Nebula. The three NGC objects are divided by darker regions. It is also called The Running Man Nebula and Sharpless Catalog 279.
Credit: Robert Turner/Wikipedia

astronomicalwonders:

Orion Nebula and Running Man

The Orion Nebula (also known as Messier 42, M42, or NGC 1976) is a diffuse nebula situated south of Orion’s Belt in the constellation of Orion. It is one of the brightest nebulae, and is visible to the naked eye in the night sky. M42 is located at a distance of 1,344 ± 20 light years and is the closest region of massive star formation to Earth. The M42 nebula is estimated to be 24 light years across. It has a mass of about 2000 times the mass of the Sun. Older texts frequently refer to the Orion Nebula as the Great Nebula in Orion or the Great Orion Nebula.

The Running Man Nebula (also known as NGC 1973/5/7) is a reflection nebula 1/2 degree northeast of the Orion Nebula. The three NGC objects are divided by darker regions. It is also called The Running Man Nebula and Sharpless Catalog 279.

Credit: Robert Turner/Wikipedia

(via andromeda1023)


distant-traveller:

The El Gordo massive galaxy cluster

It is bigger than a bread box. In fact, it is much bigger than all bread boxes put together. Galaxy cluster ACT-CL J0102-4915 is one of the largest and most massive objects known. Dubbed “El Gordo”, the seven billion light years (z = 0.87) distant galaxy cluster spans about seven million light years and holds the mass of a million billion Suns. The above image of El Gordo is a composite of a visible light image from the Hubble Space Telescope, an X-ray image from the Chandra Observatory showing the hot gas in pink, and a computer generated map showing the most probable distribution of dark matter in blue, computed from gravitational lens distortions of background galaxies. Almost all of the bright spots are galaxies. The blue dark matter distribution indicates that the cluster is in the middle stages of a collision between two large galaxy clusters. A careful inspection of the image will reveal a nearly vertical galaxy that appears unusually long. That galaxy is actually far in the background and has its image stretched by the gravitational lens action of the massive cluster.

Image credit: NASA, ESA, J. Jee (UC Davis) et al.

distant-traveller:

The El Gordo massive galaxy cluster

It is bigger than a bread box. In fact, it is much bigger than all bread boxes put together. Galaxy cluster ACT-CL J0102-4915 is one of the largest and most massive objects known. Dubbed “El Gordo”, the seven billion light years (z = 0.87) distant galaxy cluster spans about seven million light years and holds the mass of a million billion Suns. The above image of El Gordo is a composite of a visible light image from the Hubble Space Telescope, an X-ray image from the Chandra Observatory showing the hot gas in pink, and a computer generated map showing the most probable distribution of dark matter in blue, computed from gravitational lens distortions of background galaxies. Almost all of the bright spots are galaxies. The blue dark matter distribution indicates that the cluster is in the middle stages of a collision between two large galaxy clusters. A careful inspection of the image will reveal a nearly vertical galaxy that appears unusually long. That galaxy is actually far in the background and has its image stretched by the gravitational lens action of the massive cluster.

Image credit: NASA, ESA, J. Jee (UC Davis) et al.


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IMG_1764 by Peter Lee

IMG_1764 by Peter Lee

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pinerosolanno:

Super Mods Enter Rehab

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